CORNER MARKERS

The original Public Land Survey System corner markers set in Langlade County were wood posts, cut from local trees at the time they were needed. Obviously these posts are subject to rot and decay, logging, road building, land clearing and other factors that reduced their useful life. Ever since the original government survey was completed there has been a need to maintain the original wood posts.

In Langlade County it was mostly left up the surveyors as to what was going to be used to replace the wood posts. Iron rods and pipes were common replacements. In the resurvey records, one can see where old axles, ceramic, glass, axes, plow parts, car parts (including axles, bumpers, driveshafts etc), sleigh parts, wrenches, gun barrels and other items were used for corner markers. In the 1930’s, all or parts of several townships in the County were re-surveyed and 4” iron pipes with brass caps were set. This was the first effort to use one standard type of monument. 

Currently, a common replacement monument is a 2” x 30” iron pipe with a brass cap. If the monument is in a wooded area, a white vinyl sign post and bearing trees signs are usually used in the vicinity of the corner. Here are 2 pictures of a typical re-monumented corner in the woods. This particular corner is the SE corner of Section 13 in the Town of Neva. 

Information on all corners in the County can be obtained by contacting the County Surveyors office. 

This is a picture of a bearing tree recovered at the South quarter corner of Section 28, T34 N, R12 E, Town of Ainsworth. The blue paint makes the old blaze and axe marks visible on the trunk of this tree. Although the actual corner marker, which was a wood post is missing, this corner was reset by using the record bearing and distance from this tree. The picture below shows the new monument, just to the right of the white sign post, set from this bearing tree, the roots of which are upright and just to the left of the surveyor.